Get in line!

by Amy Smith
Line dancing at the AverofIt’s church festival season - Lebanese mahajarans, Greek festivals, and Armenian picnics. These events almost always feature excellent live music and the opportunity to line dance. There is nothing quite like a lively Greek hasapiko to spark an appetite for the chicken souvlaki the church ladies have been slaving over for weeks.

Even if you don’t know an Armenian shuffle from a Michigan Hop, get up and dance. It's fun! These events are ideal for learning - everyone from little kids to the church ladies are happy to teach you. They will appreciate that you appreciate their music and dance. And, as a belly dancer, you will round out your skills. It used to be that, after their nightclub shows, belly dancers were expected to lead the audience in line dancing. Those days are gone, but wouldn't it be nice to be able to hop onto the dance floor at the Sahara or Athenian Corner, and debke with the crowd?

There is some basic line dancing etiquette of which you should be aware. You won’t set off any international diplomatic incidents if you don’t follow it, but these guidelines will help you learn the dance, have a good time, and blend in. 

  • First, watch the dancers and see if you can parse the steps. My first teacher, Naharin, told me that she would observe and see if she could reproduce the steps, using her first and middle fingers, on the table. This seemed to help imprint the steps in her mind. Observing won’t teach you everything, and you won’t quite catch the subtleties of the rhythm as if you were dancing, but you can probably figure out the basics this way.
  • Join the line at the end - never at the beginning. I’ve seen many newbies do this, and while the line leader is always gracious about this, it’s a big faux pas. The leader of the line is setting the pace and often, doing their rock star thing - leaps, turns, and other embellishments. A newbie taking the lead slows the line and puts a damper on the leader’s improvisations. Plus, now the leader has to show the newbie the steps. 
  • Watch the second person in line to see how they dance. They are a) performing the dance sans embellishments and b) probably know the dance very well. This is how you can pick up the steps. 
  • Hold hands like the experts are doing. If they are linking pinkies, do that. If they are holding fingertips, do likewise. Have a light touch and avoid a death grip. 
  • Move! Don’t be a drag on the line. If you can’t figure out all the steps, fake it til you make it. 
  • If you are the last person in line, it’s a nice touch to fold your free arm behind your back. You will look like a natural.
If you are hesitant about jumping in, there are many teachers in the area who can give you some lessons before you venture out to the next kef: Shadia, Riena, Phaedra, Melina, Katia, and Kanina to name a few. A private lesson or two might be just what you need to feel a bit more confident about what you are doing.

Hope to see you on the dance floor!