Amanda Rose: A Modern Classic

Amanda Rose, Belly Dancer of the Universe - Egyptian Category 2008, makes her first Northeast appearance in Syracuse (NY) May 24-25. She is sponsored by the 3 Early Girls. Register online at Ionah Raqs or see the Facebook event. Amanda graciously answered a few questions for BDNE. 

Mo Geddawi said that you reminded him of Taheya Carioca. You've also been described as having a unique blend of classical and modern style. Do you take a lot of inspiration from the "Golden Age" of Egyptian belly dance? Who are your greatest influences? 

I definitely take inspiration from the “Golden Age”, though I wouldn’t say it's seen overwhelmingly in my style as you might notice in some other dancers. Egyptian dance has developed so much in the last 100 years, I really like to reflect on the development and the change, the energy and the feeling that was demonstrated throughout different periods of the dance and the approach that was taken to achieve those effects. I have a lot of influences, which makes it hard to pinpoint other artists that I specifically reflect in my dance style. I like this because it allows me to be inspired and influenced by so many great artists but still develop my style and myself differently. I would say some of my greatest influences are Randa Kamal, Munique Neith, Tito Seif, Jillina, Sahra Saeeda, Mira Betz, Orit Maftsir, Fifi Abdo, Mercedes Neito, Sharon Kihara, Khaled Mahmoud, Dina and the list can just keep going. ;-)    

Let's talk a minute about that blend of classical and modern style. What characterizes each style? Why might a dancer today want to incorporate "classical" style into her repertoire?

Dancers like Dina, Randa Kamel, and Tito Seif - who stylized their dance quite differently than one another - have really forged modern Egyptian style. The style in some ways has moved from the previous lyrical focus to a percussive focus. Now there are shimmies layered on top of everything, and you’re hitting a lot of accents. It’s a much more aggressive approach to the music. There is also an exploration of modern classical dance aspects found in Western dances that have been added into the style. Before there was a representation of some ballet, but that was really the limit of Western dance seen in Egyptian styling. Now there’s more modern dance and jazz found in the style seen in body folds, extensions, and leg work.

Classical Egyptian styling has a lot of beledy aspects, but is very lyrical and much softer than the modern style. There is a lot of light balletic traveling, and the hip work while strong, is not nearly as complicated as in the styles put forth today. What I love about classical styling is that it’s subtle, and perfect. It doesn’t need a whole lot of noise, bells and whistles - it stands alone and rings true.

I really like to blend the more aggressive, dynamic and complicated hip work, with the subtle and soft old school style, transitioning from modern dance and jazz movements into a folkloric and beledy approach. It gives me freedom to move and express myself within the realm of belly dance, but blend pieces to my own delight. 

You were a member of Ava Fleming's Black Opal Dance Company and since then have worked with Jillina on two different Bellydance Evolutions shows and Munque Neith’s International Ballet as well as having your own project ‘Team Latina’ with Mexican dancer Ashmina Karem and Spanish dancer Cristina Gadea. What do you like about being in a dance company?

I absolutely love collaborating and working with other dancers in the industry from near and far. These groups have really given me the opportunity to work with some of the most talented dancers in the world, from Europe, Asia, Latin America as well as some of the worlds most acclaimed superstar stars like Jillina, Sharon Kihara, Munique Neith, Kaeshi Chai, be under their direction and really grow from watching them work and perform behind the scenes. I’ve taken so much away from these experiences to my own company Raqs Sharki Movement Collective, and these opportunities have really made me such a better teacher, dancer, collaborator, and director. 

You choreograph both Oriental and folkloric dances for your own group, Raqs Sharki Movement Collective. Why do you think folkloric dance is important for modern belly dancers to know and perform?

Folklore is the roots and base of everything Raqs Sharki stems from. When you strip everything away, the western influences, the ballet, the jazz, the traveling and stage concepts, you’re left with beledy, and folklore. If you understand those, then you can truly represent Raqs Sharki at its fullest.