Amani Jabril: The Mind Behind the Makeup

Photo by by Robert McCurly

Best known for her fluid and deeply sensual style of dance, Amani Jabril has built her reputation on delivering stellar dance technique combined with the heart and soul of the Middle East. Trained from an early age in dance and drama, Amani has studied and performed extensively throughout Europe, the Middle East and North America. She was named Best Newcomer by Nafoura International Belly Dance Magazine.

Rosa Noreen hosts Amani at Bright Star World Dance on April 26-27.

Which came first, Middle-Eastern dance or the day job as an anthropologist?

Dance came first. I've been a dancer my whole life. I moved to Atlanta in 1998. I really enjoyed the city and had been offered a great gig dancing five to six nights out of the week. It had always been my plan to pursue an advanced degree. About two years after moving to Atlanta I was accepted to the graduate program in anthropology at Georgia State. So I was budding anthropologist by day and dancer by night. Since that time, the two have very much blended themselves into each other. I am looking forward to starting my PhD program in the fall. 

How has the day job contributed to your dance career? How has it affected your approach to learning and performing Middle-Eastern dance?

So, back to grad school... My interest in the Middle East started...oh so many years ago I'm not even sure now how or when it all got started. The thing about anthropology is that it is a discipline that expects you to conduct field work. In short, you have to "go here and do that" to fully understand the people you are working with in their own context. Well, working as a dancer, I was not only in clubs owned by Middle-Easterners, but also getting invited to parties and events where I would have otherwise not been included had I not been the dancer. I really do think that so many of our clients focus on the shiny, beautiful fun that is the belly dancer and forget that there are minds behind the makeup. In that down time between sets, some of us are watching and listening to everything! Well, that was me! My masters thesis was born out of those scenarios and the questions I had about how the Arab-American community was constructing the idea of "Arab" identity.

My dance life and academic life inform and influence each other. Being a dancer gave me an entrance into the communities I was curious about. Anthropology has given me insight into the fluid constructions of identity that humans engage in. This in turn creates different expressions of this identity, like music or dance. So when you understand how fluid and flexible the expression is, you understand that same thing about the art form. This knowledge, I think, allows the artist their fullest creative potential but also gives them the greatest access to their most authentic artistic voice, because they have been able to place their own selves within the context of the art form's culture and ideology.

Photo by Meriwan AbdullahFolkloric dance seems to be making a comeback. What is your advice to dancers who would like to include folkloric dance in their performance?

Good Lord! I do hope so!!

Sure, our dance goes through changes in style and fashion like anything else. Having said that, folklore is always there under the surface. The folklore, or the culture, is where all of the artistic expression is rooted, of course. When dancers dig deeper into the folklore they give themselves the opportunity to expand their range as dancers, but also to add depth and dimension to their art overall.

If someone wants to study... I say go for it!!! But be prepared for a journey with no destination. You will always be seeking knowledge, new sources, and inspiration. There are many ways to do this and some very good teachers out there. If you can travel...this is the best way to really get to see 'it' first hand. As for choosing teachers, my only advice... if they tell you theirs is the "authentic" way and the only way...run away! I am always a bit suspicious of a teacher who can't prove it on the dance floor or if a teacher can't handle hard questions from their students.

Who or what are your primary influences in dance?

What I find is that I continue to return to the people for my inspirations. In this case the people may be a cultural group or it may be that spontaneous energy coming off of an audience. But if you open your senses a bit, you'll find that inspiration is everywhere.

A lot my stuff rests squarely on my theatre, jazz, and ballet backgrounds. I am influenced by my travels and the people I encounter there.

Photo by MaharetTell us about your upcoming dance intensive.

The raison d'être of the Dancers' Intensive is to give dancers an opportunity to focus less on their product, more on their process, and to work intensely on the craft that is dance performance.

Dancecraft is a term I use when referring to the technical aspects of theatrical dance and its production. From your first choice of music, it includes, but is not limited to, conditioning your body, constructing choreography, designing and staging your performance. It also includes those supporting functions, that without them, no artist could even conceive of presenting their art.

More technical than artistic, Dancecraft is the practical implementation of an artistic vision and that's what we will focus on ....Crafting the Art of Dance!

Over this weekend-long event, we will explore our artistic connections with our bodies, the rhythms of the Dance and our interconnected and interdependent expressions of art through a series of intermediate/advanced level workshops, forums and shows designed to help Middle Eastern dance-artists refine their craft in a unique and conscientious way.

At the 2014 Intensive, we have made the move to having all live music in classes and in performance. Like last year' s event, we will again be working with Jonatan Gomes Derbaq from Mazaag. Jonatan and I worked together on the Mazaag debut album that released last year and we are looking forward to working together on shows and workshops in 2014 & 2015.